Monthly Archives: April 2019

Social work staff in West Dunbartonshire vote overwhelmingly to strike

Social work staff in West Dunbartonshire have voted overwhelmingly to take strike action, claiming unsafe practices and unacceptable workloads are putting vulnerable people at risk.

UNISON announced the result of its consultative ballot today (Monday) which revealed a massive 92.3 per cent voted to take strike action. And 100 per cent of those who took part in the ballot voted in favour of action short of strike action. UNISON’s consultative ballot of Children and Families Social Work staff had a turnout of 87.8 per cent.

Simon Macfarlane, UNISON regional organiser, said: “This is a phenomenal result and clearly illustrates the resolve of our members to stand up to unacceptable workloads and unsafe practices in West Dunbartonshire. This is about the safety of workers and vulnerable children and their families and our members are to be congratulated for taking a stand.”

UNISON will be meeting management tomorrow (Tuesday) and is calling for immediate action to put an end to short staffing, unacceptable workloads, unallocated cases and unsuitable arrangements for access meetings.

Simon continued: “Management must heed this crystal clear message from our members and we will not hesitate to move to a formal industrial action ballot to keep our members safe. This is the reality of needless austerity in 2019, workers at breaking point and at-risk children unsupported.

“We have raised our concerns beyond West Dunbartonshire and welcome that Peter Macleod, chief executive of the Care Inspectorate and Lorraine Gray, chief executive of the Scottish Social Services Council, have both confirmed they are raising the matter with the council and the Health and Social Care Partnership. It is now time for the council administration and management to act and ensure the safety of workers, children and families.

For further information: Simon Macfarlane 07703 194132

The Future of Working Time: Organising and Strategy

OPEN INVITE              

The Future of Working Time: Organising and Strategy                        

Tuesday 7 May 2019                       

14:00 – 17:00                   

TUC Congress House

(Please Register – Eventbrite)

·     Join NEF and TUC on Tuesday 7 May from 2pm, for a participatory session on organising and campaigning around working time. Hear from experienced organisers and build strategy around:

–     Winning control over working hours: how do we organise against precarious and insecure forms of work?

–     Winning a shorter working week: why should we demand it and how do we get there?

·     This event is open to anyone who wants to develop their knowledge of these issues and build power in the workplace. We know the best ideas will come from the ground up, so come prepared to listen and share your experiences and ideas with others.

·     Full events details and registration HERE

·      For additional information, Kate Bell writes why trade unions are calling for a four-day week.

The battle for Algeria’s streets begins: police attack protests as mass strikes sweep country

Protests and strikes demanding the new ‘transitional’ president Abdelkader Bensalah follow Bouteflika out of office are gathering pace across Algeria. On the railways, in the ports, government offices, schools, universities and across large swathes of manufacturing, workers are walking out or going into occupation in solidarity with the continuing demonstrations in major cities demanding that all the key figures associated with the old regime step down.

But the regime is fighting back: police attacked a major student protest outside the Post Office in the capital Algiers on 9 April. Trade union federation COSYFOP condemned the attack on student protesters by security forces and urged workers to join the general strike planned for 10 April: “The strike continues, and we will escalate our action until we win freedom,” the federation said in a statement on Facebook.

Thousands of demonstrators were met again with police water cannons and tear gas on 10 April, but news reports showed large crowds continuing to rally despite the efforts of police to smash the protests. Thousands could also be seen in reports from social media marching in other major cities including Tizi Ouzou, Bouira, Tiaret, Annaba, Blida, Batna, and Tlemcen. School and university students are leading many of the demonstrations, alongside their teachers who have been at the forefront of strike action in recent years.

What you can do:

 

 

  • Send a message of solidarity to trade unions and student unions in Algeria – email menasolidarity@gmail.com and we will pass it on or let you know where to send direct
  • Download a copy of our briefing on teachers’ struggles with a model motion: [Teachers_MENA_2019]

Reel News invitation to online flim premiere: “American Climate Rebels” starts on April 14

JOIN US FOR A LIVE INTERACTIVE PREMIERE OF EPISODE 1 ON APRIL 14TH – LIVE CHAT DURING THE PREMIERE WITH REEL NEWS, PLUS IAN HUSSEY AND ANGELE ALOOK FROM THE PARKLANDS INSTITUTE, ALBERTA. TO SET A REMINDER, OPEN THIS LINK TO THE “WATCH SCREEN” IN YOUTUBE: 

https://youtu.be/VWxNDvJYC1M

PRESS “SUBSCRIBE” (IF YOU’RE NOT SUBSCRIBED TO OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL ALREADY) AND THEN PRESS THE BELL.

Click here to watch official trailer

In 2018, Reel News went on a 14 week tour of North America to look at grassroots struggles around climate change, particularly struggles around a “just transition” from fossil fuels to renewable energy, where workers and communities control the process so that they benefit from the transition, and around “just recovery” – recovery from extreme weather events which do not exascerbate current inequalities.

What we found were inspiring and visionary struggles all over the continent, led by working class communities of colour, with people organising just transitions and just recoveries themselves. Now, we’ll be presenting what we found in the form of a weekly online 11 episode series starting on Sunday April 14th – 7pm UK time, 3pm New York City time, Midday California time.

Episode 1 is about Alberta, Canada, where the long oil sands boom  has come to an end. Falling oil prices are leading to thousands of job losses – which has started a serious conversation in the labour movement about transitioning away from oil to renewables. The need is becoming more urgent as the big oil sands companies look to maximise profits and slash even more jobs through automation. This film looks at a number of initiatives, the history of oppression of First Nations people to get the resources in the first place, and a rare chance to hear from oil sands workers themselves, including women and First Nations workers.

With the current growing uprising over climate change giving renewed hope, we’re hoping that this will not only inspire you further – but will also help a little in putting the idea of just transition at the forefront of the movement.

Barnet Alliance for Public Services: We need your potholes!

We have a fantastic potholes song that cannot be published yet until a suitable video to accompany it will be produced.

For that we need MANY PHOTOS OF POTHOLES and broken pavements.

We know there are hundreds of those across Barnet, but not many come through to the POTY Facebook page that Holly created.

The song and video will help promote this campaign towards the 17 June P&R meeting which will decide on whether to bring the Highways service back in-house, but we cannot use it until we get the pictures!

SO:

Please take photos of any pothole you come across and send them immediately.

You can take the photo on your mobile phone and send by What’sUp to me (07957-486 379),

Or attach to an email and send to this email account by Reply.

THE SOONER THE BETTER!

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