CWU reacts to High Court Judgement

The CWU is extremely disappointed at the ruling and we have no doubt our members and representatives will feel the same way. Following 18 months of negotiations, including external mediation, the company’s actions are nothing more than a desperate delaying tactic from a board who are increasingly out of touch with the views of its workforce.

Legal proceedings and Royal Mail’s court room politics will not solve the company’s problems. The union has nothing to fear from mediation and unless there is significant movement from the company on a range of issues and a satisfactory agreement is concluded, the union will be calling further strike action once the mediation process has been completed. Furthermore, we will not allow Royal Mail to string out the process beyond the minimum required period.

CWU General Secretary Dave Ward said “The company are deluded if they believe their court room politics will resolve this dispute. Instead the company’s actions will have the complete opposite effect. Postal Workers’ attitude towards the company will harden and it makes us more determined than ever to defend our members pensions, jobs, service and achieve our objectives.”

“Unless the company significantly shifts its position on a range of issues and we can quickly conclude a good agreement for our members then strike action is inevitable. “

“We walked into the court today with a massive 90% yes vote for strike action – we walked out of the court today with a massive 90% vote for strike action. We want an agreement and will comply with the injunction to undertake further external mediation. But sooner rather than later Royal Mail Group will have to confront the harsh reality that they are completely out of touch with the views of its workforce.“

CWU Deputy General Secretary Terry Pullinger said “We saw today that Royal Mail Group would rather spend time, money and resources playing politics than engaging with this union to reach an agreement. Our members are square behind the CWU and from this moment we are putting Royal Mail on notice of further action should the mediation fail. Let me be clear – we will not stand by and see this once great institution run into the ground. Our members will stand up and save it by whatever means are necessary.”

“We will use the mediation process to seek an agreement but also to galvanise support amongst our members and the public. Be in no doubt though, if Royal Mail Group are not serious about reaching an agreement we will not hesitate to call strike action immediately after the mediation period closes.”

#mcstrike: The start of something big

On Tuesday, McDonald’s workers took strike action to demand a fair wage and a union to represent them. Thousands of supporters backed their call and made sure McDonald’s know they’re up against a powerful movement. 

In more than 35 locations across the country, supporters organised McStrike solidarity actions, speaking to the public about the campaign. Their conversations are critical in building public support and putting pressure on McDonald’s.

And you couldn’t pick up a newspaper yesterday without reading about McStrike. There was coverage in The Mirror, The Guardian, The iThe Daily Mail and many more. 

And this is just the beginning. McDonald’s will not back down easily, which is why your support is so important. Our movement will grow and these workers will strike again.

We will fight until these workers, and workers everywhere, get what’s fair.

This campaign will be long, so anything you can chip in will help our movement win.

Chip in to support McDonald’s workers and the McStrike

Coca-Cola violates workers’ rights around the world

Coca-Cola continues to violate the fundamental rights of workers in Haiti, Indonesia, Ireland and the USA.

The International Union of Foodworkers (IUF) has launched a global online campaign to protest this — which we encourage you to support.

In Haiti, Coca-Cola’s bottler continues to systematically deny workers their right to form and be represented by a union.

In Indonesia, Coca-Cola’s bottler pursues its long running attack on the rights of independent, democratic trade unions.

In Ireland, Coca-Cola closed two of its directly owned concentrate plants, both of which were strongly unionised, and shifted production to the remaining plant in Ballina, where it refuses to engage in collective bargaining with the union.

And finally, in the USA the company’s bottler spent more than $330,000 hiring a union-busting consultant firm to persuade workers at its Greenfield bottling plant to not join the union.

Please show your support for the IUF campaign by sending a clear message to Coca-Cola CEO and Chairman James Quincey, expressing your outrage over these ongoing human rights violations and demanding that the company act to remedy them. 

Please share this message with your friends, family and fellow union members.

Coca-Cola workers fighting for their rights in Haiti, Indonesia, Ireland, and the USA still need your support

Coca-Cola continues to violate the fundamental rights of workers in Haiti, Indonesia, Ireland and the USA.
In Haiti Coke’s bottler La Brasserie de la Couronne continues to systematically deny workers their right to form and be represented by a union, SYTBRACOUR.
Haiti is a dangerous place to live and to work. Companies should, at a minimum, be alert to this situation and exercise maximum due diligence. In July 2019, a Coca-Cola truck driver was shot in his vehicle while at work. The Coca-Cola Company has made no meaningful independent investigation of this killing, choosing instead to rely on a version of events provided by their local bottler, which sought to shift blame onto the driver. Subsequent IUF investigations into this case have exonerated the driver and exposed a callous disregard for the truth on the part of the Coca-Cola bottler and The Coca-Cola Company.

In Indonesia Coca-Cola bottler Amatil pursues its long running attack on the rights of independent, democratic trade unions.

In Ireland, The Coca-Cola Company closed two of its directly owned concentrate plants, both of which were strongly unionized, and shifted production to the remaining plant in Ballina, where it refuses to engage in collective bargaining with the IUF-affiliated SIPTU.

In the USA the Company’s bottler spent more than 330,000.00 US dollars hiring a union-busting consultant firm to persuade workers at its Greenfield bottling plant to not join the RWDSU/UFCW.

Please show your support for these workers and the fight for rights in the Coca-Cola system.

CLICK HERE to send a message to Coca-Cola’s CEO and Chairman James Quincey, expressing your outrage over these ongoing human rights violations and demanding the Company act to remedy them. Your name will also be added to a petition that will be delivered to The Coca-Cola Company.

CWU Supporters: FIGHT against exploitative employers

The fight against exploitative employers, dodgy contracts and insecure work requires the support of every single community across the country.

Our recent vote for strike action in Royal Mail Group was secured by connecting with our membership in every corner of the UK – both online and on the ground.

Now we need your help to take our message to the public. By joining CWU Supporters you will be contacted with campaign materials and resources that will help us win this battle – and the others we are fighting

Be one of the first to join us by signing up below. Once you have joined us, don’t forget to hit share so that you can alert your social media networks to our new network.

Join CWU Supporters now

WAR ON WANT: McDonald’s workers are striking, 12 November!


McDonald’s workers are going on strike again! Join a group organising call with workers and Owen Jones to plan action in solidarity.

In the largest strike yet, workers from six stores in south London have been balloted and will take on their multinational employer in a strike on 12 November, as part of a global day of action for fast food rights.

The workers I’ve met are both nervous and excited. They’ve come together into a union to win the respect they deserve. Will you take action to show your solidarity?

Together with the TUC, we’ve organised a group call with War on Want patron Owen Jones, where the McDonald’s workers will share their plan to win and together we can build the biggest ever show of solidarity with fast food workers.

JOIN THE CALL

These brave workers are taking on the second largest private employer in the world to demand basic things that every worker should have: a wage they can live on, secure hours and a union so their employer has to listen to their concerns.

Workers have told me how the demonstrations of support from War on Want supporters like during previous McStrikes meant that when they walked back into their stores, they could hold their head up high.

Lewis, a McDonald’s worker in Crayford store told me that McDonald’s was telling the workers that the public wouldn’t support them, that they would be on their own. He said:

“Every message of support builds our confidence as we stand up to this bullying company and demand a fair wage and respect on the job.”

So let’s make this not only the biggest McStrike yet with the number of stores going on strike, but also the biggest show of solidarity with McDonald’s workers ever.

JOIN THE CALL

On 12 November, trade unions all around the world will be taking action to demand respect for fast food workers. McDonald’s is global, but so is our movement. Sign up now, join the call and let’s organise to win respect for McDonald’s and fast food workers all around the world.

When we win for McDonald’s workers, we win for everyone. That’s the meaning of solidarity.

Owen Espley
Labour rights campaigner
War on Want

PCS win London Living Wage at BEIS after months of indefinite strike action

ISS staff working at BEIS have won “gold standard” terms and conditions, including the London Living Wage after 3 months of indefinite strike action.

Porters, security, post room, cleaners and receptionist staff have all taken rolling strike action in the long running dispute since ISS took over the contract in January this year.

And cleaners took the decision to take indefinite strike action for 3 months in order to win a just settlement.

Members of the Public and Commercial Services Union (PCS) won better pay, sick pay and increased annual leave following the action.

Caterers working for Aramark who were also on indefinite strike won their dispute last month.

The protracted dispute saw huge picket lines, a foodbank being set up in the department because pay was so low and solidarity from across the trade union movement.

Reacting to the win by workers at BEIS, PCS general secretary Mark Serwotka said: “This has been a heroic effort by our members from start to finish.

“They have shown the entire trade union movement that when you stick together and strike together, anything is possible.

“Our members who are mainly migrant workers, have endured immense hardship with the local branch having to set up a food bank to support workers due to pay being so low.

“ISS have been a very intransient employer and if wasn’t for the steadfastness of our striking members, they would not have won a just settlement.

“This whole episode underlines the clear need for all private contracted out staff in government departments to be immediately brought back in house and given civil service pay and conditions.”

Follow PCS on Twitter @pcs_union 

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